Medical Services related to James Barklow Froehlich MD

Anticoagulants

Anticoagulants (sometimes known as “blood thinners”) are drugs that prevent blood from clotting or prevent existing clots from getting larger. They can keep harmful clots from forming in the heart, veins or arteries.

Fibromuscular Dysplasia

Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a vascular disease that causes abnormal cell development in the walls of one or more arteries. This can put individuals at risk for artery blockages, stroke, artery dissection (tear in an artery) or aneurysm (artery bulge).

PAD Treatments

Treatments for peripheral artery disease or PAD (sometimes called peripheral vascular disease) include both surgical and non-surgical options. All PAD patients are treated using risk factor management and exercise. Surgery is reserved for patients with the most serious symptoms.

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)

The difference between peripheral artery disease or PAD (sometimes called peripheral vascular disease) and heart disease is that the blockages are outside your heart, usually in the legs. The University of Michigan’s Peripheral Arterial Disease Program brings together a multidisciplinary team of physicians to create a treatment plan tailored to your needs.

Pulmonary Embolism and CTEPH

Pulmonary emboli can present as acute PE or chronic PE. Acute PE is a new obstruction causing acute onset heart strain and often needs immediate treatment with clot busters and blood thinning medications. Chronic PE is a more insidious presentation that includes heart failure with gradual progressive symptoms and is caused by an older residual obstruction resulting from an undissolved clot in the pulmonary circulation left over from previous acute pulmonary emboli. In addition, in a small percentage of patients, chronic PE can lead to elevated blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries over time, developing into a rare type of pulmonary hypertension called chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).

Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection (SCAD)

Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a type of heart attack caused by a tear within the layers of one or more arteries that supply blood to the heart. Unlike a traditional heart attack caused by a blockage in the artery due to the buildup of plaque and blood clot formation, SCAD involves an artery dissection, or tear. The tear may create a flap or cause a blood clot to form. Both can block blood flow to the heart muscle, resulting in a heart attack.