Propofol

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Propofol

Interaction

Propofol

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Depletion or interference—This medication may deplete these substances from the body or interfere with how they work; extra intake may help replenish them.

none

dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Side effect reduction and/or prevention—These substances may help reduce the likelihood and/or severity of a potential side effect caused by the medication.

Catechin*

Ginger*

Milk Thistle*

dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Supportive interaction—These substances may help this medication work better.

none

dnicon_Avoid Avoid: Reduces drug effectiveness—When taking this medication, avoid these substances as they may decrease the medication's absorption and/or activity in the body.

none

dnicon_Avoid Avoid: Adverse interaction—When taking this medication, avoid these substances, as the combination may cause undesirable or dangerous interactions.

none

dnicon_Check Check: Explanation needed—When taking this medication, read the article details and discuss them with your doctor or pharmacist before taking these substances.

none


An asterisk (*) next to an item in the summary indicates that the interaction is supported only by weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Interactions Details

Interactions with Vitamins

Catechin

Some general anesthetic drugs have infrequently caused liver damage. One animal study showed that taking catechin (a bioflavonoid) prior to halothane exposure reduced the amount of liver damage caused by the drug.1 Additional research is needed to determine whether this protective effect occurs in humans and with other general anesthetics.

Interactions with Herbs

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide.2 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)

Some general anesthetic drugs have infrequently caused liver damage. One animal study showed that taking silybine, an active compound found in milk thistle, prior to halothane exposure reduced the amount of liver damage caused by the drug.3 Though controlled research in humans is necessary, some doctors of natural medicine currently suggest taking milk thistle standardized to contain 140 mg of silymarin three times a day, beginning a week before surgery and continuing for at least one week after surgery.

Brands

Common brand names:

Diprivan

References

1. Siegers CP, Fruhling A, Younes M. Influence of dithiocarb, (+)-catechin and silybine on halothane hepatotoxicity in the hypoxic rat model. Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh) 1983;53:125–9.

2. Phillips S, Ruggier R, Hutchinson SE. Zingiber officinale (ginger)—an antiemetic for day case surgery. Anaesthesia 1993;48:715–7.

3. Siegers CP, Fruhling A, Younes M. Influence of dithiocarb, (+)-catechin and silybine on halothane hepatotoxicity in the hypoxic rat model. Acta Pharmacol Toxicol (Copenh) 1983;53:125–9.

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