Medical Services related to Katherine Ann Gallagher MD

Angioplasty and Stenting

At the University of Michigan, our Advanced Interventional Cardiology Program offers comprehensive and individualized care, utilizing the latest technologies currently available for angioplasty and stenting, performed by our skilled team of interventional cardiologists.

Aortic Aneurysm

 The University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center offers both open heart surgery and minimally invasive treatments for aortic aneurysm.

Aortic Disease

University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center Aortic Disease program began in 1995 and has a long history of treating all types of aortic disease.

Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease (AIOD)

Aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) is common in patients with PAD. AIOD is the blockage of the aorta, the main blood vessel in your body, or the iliac arteries. The aorta divides into the iliac arteries, which provide blood to the legs and organs in your pelvis. This blockage is typically caused by a buildup of plaque within the walls of the blood vessels.

Arteriosclerotic Aortic Disease

 

University of Michigan Aortic Disease Program treats all kinds of arterial disease, including arteriosclerotic aortic disease (hardening of the arteries).

Fibromuscular Dysplasia

Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is a vascular disease that causes abnormal cell development in the walls of one or more arteries. This can put individuals at risk for artery blockages, stroke, artery dissection (tear in an artery) or aneurysm (artery bulge).

Hemodialysis Access by Vascular Surgeons

Hemodialysis is a treatment that purifies the blood of a person whose kidneys have failed. This treatment involves a machine used to route a patient’s blood through a filter, called a dialyzer, outside the body. The two types of vascular access for patients on long-term hemodialysis include arteriovenous (AV) fistula and arteriovenous (AV) graft.

PAD Treatments

Treatments for peripheral artery disease or PAD (sometimes called peripheral vascular disease) include both surgical and non-surgical options. All PAD patients are treated using risk factor management and exercise. Surgery is reserved for patients with the most serious symptoms.

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)

The difference between peripheral artery disease or PAD (sometimes called peripheral vascular disease) and heart disease is that the blockages are outside your heart, usually in the legs. The University of Michigan’s Peripheral Arterial Disease Program brings together a multidisciplinary team of physicians to create a treatment plan tailored to your needs.

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome

Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is a rare vascular condition that affects the legs. It occurs when the popliteal artery — the dominant source of blood supply to the leg below the knee — becomes compressed by a muscle, tendon or band behind the knee. This compression restricts blood flow to the lower leg and can cause damage to the artery over time. PAES affects individuals under the age of 55, but is more commonly diagnosed in younger, highly active athletes whose calf muscles become enlarged due to exercise and training. Men are two times more likely than women to have the condition.