Medical Services related to John C. Magee MD

Hand Transplant

The first transplant in the state of Michigan took place at Michigan Medicine in 1964. Now, we are again taking the helm by creating the first hand transplant program in Michigan.  Our goal for you is to improve your quality of life by enabling you to have more independence, ability and mobility through the gift of a hand transplant.

Hand Transplant Process

Candidates for hand transplant require a comprehensive evaluation. The process includes patient education, medical records review, patient examination and often additional medical testing. Our multidisciplinary transplant team then reviews the case and makes a decision about the patient's suitability for a donor hand on a case by case basis.

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT)

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia  (HHT) is a genetic disorder that affects about one in 5,000 people and commonly causes nosebleeds, with more frequent nosebleeds typically starting after about age 12.  Patients with HHT have a tendency to form blood vessels that are abnormal, fragile, and bleed more easily. 

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) Treatment

There are many different specialists who treat patients with HHT. Many patients will eventually see two or more types of specialists, especially later in adulthood. Specialists who treat HHT include otolaryngologists (ear, nose & throat doctors), interventional radiologists (to treat AVMs), hematologists (to help manage anemia), and more.

Kidney and Pancreas Transplant

The University of Michigan Transplant Center is the largest and most experienced transplant center in Michigan, and among the largest in the nation, with outcomes for kidney and pancreas transplant in compliance with the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients – our patient survival rate at one year is 98%, kidney transplant survival for one year is 95%, and pancreas graph survival for one year is 85%-90% – and we offer services that are not offered widely, including a Paired Kidney Donation Program (only one in the state, utilizing U-M computer software to match kidneys to hard-to-match recipients) and desensitization (for people with too many antibodies or whose blood type doesn’t match an available donor).

Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Patient Care Guide

The PDF links on this page link to material in the University of Michigan Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Patient Education Guide and allow you to view and print the information on your own computer.

Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Process

The University of Michigan Transplant Center is the largest and most experienced transplant center in Michigan, and among the largest in the nation, with outcomes for kidney and pancreas transplant in compliance with the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients – our patient survival rate at one year is 98%, kidney transplant survival for one year is 95%, and pancreas graph survival for one year is 85%-90% – and we offer services that are not offered widely, including a Paired Kidney Donation Program (only one in the state, utilizing U-M computer software to match kidneys to hard-to-match recipients) and desensitization (for people with too many antibodies or whose blood type doesn’t match an available donor).

Kidney Desensitization Program

The University of Michigan Kidney Desensitization Program is able to perform kidney transplants in patients who otherwise might be left with no options due to high amounts of antibodies circulating in their blood. By performing a special blood test to determine the level of these antibodies, desensitization can remove them using medications and a process similar to dialysis, improving the chances that a donated kidney will not be rejected by the recipient’s body.

Kidney Transplant Program (Pediatric)

The University of Michigan Pediatric Kidney Transplant Program is the most experienced program within the state of Michigan, with particular expertise in the transplantation of children under the age of 2, performing more than 500 kidney transplants since the program's beginning in1964, and reporting organ rejection and patient survival rates that rank among the world's best.

Liver Transplant

The University of Michigan Transplant Center is the largest and most experienced transplant center in Michigan, and among the largest in the nation, with 80-100 liver transplants performed each year, We offer services that are not widely available, including liver transplant for cancer of the bile duct and splitting a donor liver, using the smaller portion to transplant a child and the larger portion to transplant an adult.

Liver Transplant (Pediatric)

The Pediatric Liver Transplant Program at the University of Michigan is part of the first and largest liver transplant program in the state, and one of the original transplant centers in the country – performing 300 pediatric liver transplants since 1986 – with a dedicated, multidisciplinary pediatric team, including nutritionists to help children get the calories they need to diminish complications post transplant.

Liver Transplant Patient Care Guide

The PDF links on this page link to material in the University of Michigan Kidney and Liver Transplant Patient Education Guide and allow you to view and print the information from your own computer.

Liver Transplant Process

The first step of the liver transplant process is a comprehensive evaluation to determine the patient's suitability for a donor liver.

Living Kidney Donation

If you are waiting for a kidney, having a live donor can decrease your waiting time for a kidney transplant. Your parents, children, siblings, other relatives, in-laws, and close friends can all be considered for living kidney donation. Some people do not have a designated recipient and end up donating a kidney to someone they do not know. A University of Michigan-developed software program works to match an incompatible recipient/donor pair with other pairs in the same situation, offering new hope to those needing kidney transplants.

Transplantation

Since the first transplant in Michigan took place at the University of Michigan back in 1964, more than 10,000 patients have benefited from our devotion to the individual. We perform over 400 transplants annually, including lung, liver, heart and lung transplants, making us the largest and most experienced transplant center in Michigan--and among the largest in the nation.