Medical Services related to Michelle Ann Anderson MD

Ampullary Polyps

The ampulla, or ampulla of vater, is where the pancreatic duct and bile duct join together to drain into the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. A polyp of the ampulla starts out benign but can turn into cancer of the ampulla as it grows. At the Bile Duct and Pancreatic Diseases Program, part of the University of Michigan’s Division of Gastroenterology, our multidisciplinary team provides the newest, minimally invasive treatments for removing ampullary polyps, performed by experienced gastroenterologists with high volumes in these procedures.

Bile Duct Leaks

A bile duct leak can arise either as a complication of a surgery, such as gallbladder removal or liver transplant, or from trauma to the biliary system. At the Bile Duct and Pancreatic Diseases Program, part of the University of Michigan’s Division of Gastroenterology, our multidisciplinary team provides the newest minimally invasive treatments for bile duct leaks that are not widely available, performed by experienced gastroenterologists with high volumes in this procedure.

Bile Duct Stones

Bile duct stones are gallstones in the bile duct, which can start in the gallbladder and migrate into the bile duct, or form in the bile duct itself. The stones can become lodged in the bile duct, causing a blockage. At the Bile Duct and Pancreatic Diseases Program, part of the University of Michigan’s Division of Gastroenterology, our multidisciplinary team provides the newest in minimally invasive treatments for bile duct stones, performed by experienced gastroenterologists with high volumes in these procedures.

Cancer

The University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center provides comprehensive cancer care, cutting-edge treatment, plus new therapies and clinical trials through our multidisciplinary cancer clinics.

Colon and Rectal Polyps

Colon and rectal polyps occur in about 25 percent of men and women ages 50 and older. Not all polyps will turn into cancer, and it may take many years for a polyp to become cancerous. Risk factors include a family history of polyps or colon cancer; an inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease; a high-fat, low-fiber diet; tobacco and alcohol use; little exercise; and obesity.

Digestive and Liver Health

Digestive health at the University of Michigan Health System diagnoses and treats diseases of the gastrointestinal system of the body, including irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's Disease, GERD, liver disease and constipation.

Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)

Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies, also known as ERCP– a treatment tool as well as an examination and diagnostic tool for the pancreas, bile ducts, liver, and gallbladder – are performed by doctors from the Gastroenterology Program at the University of Michigan, ranked best in the state by U.S. News & World Report.

Endoscopic Ultrasound

Endoscopic ultrasounds, also known as EUS – a treatment tool as well as an examination and diagnostic tool for the lining and the walls of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract along with the gallbladder and pancreas –are performed by doctors from the University of Michigan Division of Gastroenterology.

Gastrointestinal Diagnostics & Procedures

The Gastroenterology Division at the University of Michigan provides specialized diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and services to diagnose and treat patients with a wide variety of gastrointestinal disorders. These services are all provided through the multidisciplinary Medical Procedures Unit, which is located in University Hospital. We perform approximately 15,000 procedures per year.

Make a GI Appointment

Make an appointment with an GI or liver specialist (gastroenterologist or hepatologist) at the University of Michigan or call one of our special clinic phone numbers. Call 1-888-229-7408 to get answers to your questions.

Our Care Team

Your gastrointestinal medical care team will depend upon the specific GI condition you are being treated for and often includes doctors with different medical specialties along with other health professionals collaborating to give you the best care possible. This is called a multidisciplinary approach, and at the University of Michigan, our goal is always to coordinate this multidisciplinary care in a way that is convenient and efficient for you.

Pancreatitis

At the Pancreatic Biliary Program, part of the University of Michigan’s Gastroenterology Division, our multidisciplinary team provides minimally invasive diagnostic and treatment options for pancreatitis that are not widely available, performed by experienced gastroenterologists with high volumes in these procedures.

Why Choose Michigan for Your Digestive and Liver Care

Gastroenterology specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the gastrointestinal system of the body, which includes the esophagus, stomach, intestines, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, colon and rectum.

Your Digestive System

Your digestive system is made up of a series of organs that allows your body to get the nutrients and energy it needs from the food we eat.  As food travels through the digestive system it is broken down, sorted, and reprocessed before being circulated around the body to nourish and replace cells and supply energy to our muscles. This page includes an animation of the digestive process as well as a description of the various digestive organs and diseases related to them that we treat at the University of Michigan.