Pneumonia

Pneumonia is a lung infection that is usually caused by bacteria or viruses. It is frequently a complication of another condition, like the flu. Symptoms often include a cough, fever and difficulty breathing.

Pneumonia can range in seriousness from mild to life-threatening. Most people with pneumonia can be treated at home but some people may require hospitalization, particularly older people or those with chronic diseases such as asthma, heart disease, cancer or diabetes.

At the University of Michigan Health System, we evaluate our performance in caring for pneumonia patients who are seen in the Emergency Department and subsequently admitted to the hospital by measuring the extent to which we follow best practices and achieve the best results. We have met and often exceeded our quality goals for care we deliver in the Emergency Department and in the inpatient (hospital) settings.

Explanations of the importance of each measure and how to interpret the results are provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), a federal agency that evaluates quality of care delivered at hospitals nationwide.

The following graphs describe the performance of the University of Michigan Health System by measuring the extent to which we follow best practices when treating patients hospitalized with pneumonia. These best practices are also called evidence-based processes of care. When followed, they lead to better outcomes.

Appropriate Antibiotic Given
Higher Value = Better Performance

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

Pneumonia is a lung infection that is usually caused by bacteria or a virus. If pneumonia is caused by bacteria, hospitals will treat the infection with antibiotics. Different bacteria are treated with different antibiotics. This measure shows the percentage of patients who receive a recommended antibiotic. A higher percentage means better performance.

How is UMHS Performing?

The University of Michigan Health System performance in providing the appropriate antibiotic is consistently at or above the national average.

UMHS Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: National average from CMS / Hospital Compare.

In this section, we evaluate outcomes following treatment of patients hospitalized with pneumonia by measuring patient survival rates and re-hospitalization rates. We compare our rates to the national average, provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The risk of death and re-hospitalization depends on many factors, including the patient's health condition. The risk of the patients we treat may be greater than the risk of patients represented in the CMS average, because the University of Michigan Health System treats many complex patients who have pneumonia and other serious medical problems. However, as the graphs below show, UMHS is successful in managing these complex cases. In both graphs, when our rates appear in the green bar, our performance is no different from the national average.

Pneumonia Survival

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

This measure evaluates the survival of pneumonia patients who are insured by Medicare and hospitalized at the University of Michigan Health System. Medicare produces and reports this rate for hospitals across the country. To help you compare performance of the University of Michigan to hospitals nationally, Medicare adjusts the rates to try and correct for differences in the severity of illness of patients treated at different hospitals.

How is UMHS Performing?

Pneumonia patients who receive treatment at the University of Michigan Health System have a survival rate that is better than the national average.

UMHS Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: National average from CMS/ Hospital Compare

Pneumonia Re-Hospitalization

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

This measure is defined as the percentage of patients insured by Medicare who were discharged from our hospital following treatment of pneumonia and were then re-hospitalized within 30 days. This measure evaluates several aspects of care: the quality of care during the first hospitalization and the effectiveness of our efforts to prepare patients for discharge and coordinate follow-up care with their outpatient physicians. Our goal is to address the patient's needs while they are in the hospital so that they do not experience problems when they return home.

To help you compare performance of the University of Michigan to hospitals nationally, Medicare adjusts the rates to try and correct for differences in the severity of illness of patients treated at different hospitals.

How is UMHS Performing?

Re-hospitalization rates for pneumonia patients at the University of Michigan Health System are mostly no different than the national average. Reaching this goal can be difficult when treating severely-ill patients, however, we are working to improve our performance by providing better instructions for patients before they are discharged from the hospital and by coordinating follow-up care with their outpatient physicians.

UMHS Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: National average from CMS/ Hospital Compare.