Pediatric Kidney Transplant

Kidney transplant is a surgical procedure where a patient has a healthy kidney from a donor implanted. Kidneys remove excess fluid and waste from the blood. With kidney failure, kidneys lose this filtering ability and dangerous levels of fluid and waste build up. Kidney failure can be caused by diabetes, chronic, uncontrolled high blood pressure or chronic glomerulonephritis (inflammation and eventual scarring within the kidney).

Only one donated kidney is needed to replace two failed kidneys, making it possible to transplant a kidney from a living donor. If a compatible living donor isn't available for a kidney transplant, a patient's name may be placed on a kidney transplant waiting list to receive a kidney from a deceased donor. The wait could be a year or more.

Procedure volume is the number of times a procedure was performed and is often used to assess clinical experience and expertise. Studies have linked higher volumes with more successful outcomes for some types of procedures.

The data below is based on kidney transplants done at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital in patients less than 18 years old.

Number of Kidney Transplants

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

Health systems that perform a high number of kidney transplants are more likely to have better outcomes, such as better survival rates. Unfortunately, there is no standard or agreed upon threshold that defines high volume, so it is important to consider volume along with other measures, such as outcome measures.

How is UMHS Performing?

In 2013, surgeons at the University of Michigan Health System performed 18 kidney transplants for children and a total of 189 kidney transplants for patients of all ages.

According to the U.S. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, typical kidney transplant rate for 2013 was 22.4 which is greater than the national rate of 7.9. Our volume is higher demonstrating that UMHS has considerable experience in kidney transplantation.

UMHS Source: Hospital administrative data.
Comparison Group Source: None.

In this section, we evaluate the success of the kidney transplants by measuring several outcomes, such as patient and graft survival. Because the severity of disease differs between patients, some patients have a higher risk of death. So, we compare our actual performance to what is expected given the risk of the patients we treat. The expected survival rate is provided by the U.S. Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). For all measures, percentages that are higher than the SRTR expected rate mean better performance.

Graft Survival Rates After Transplant
Higher Value = Better Performance

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

A "graft" refers to the transplanted organ. Graft survival is a measure of the success of the kidney transplant. Sometimes the transplant, or graft, may fail, but the person may survive. This measure represents the percentage of grafts for pediatric patients that survived 1 month, 1 year and 3 years after kidney transplant. The actual graft survival rate for the University of Michigan Health System is compared to the expected rate for our institution calculated by the US Scientific Registry for Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Although the SRTR expected rates are adjusted to account for the severity of illness of our transplant population, the adjustment is not perfect. In this graph, a percentage that is higher than the SRTR expected rate means better performance.

How is UMHS Performing?

The University of Michigan Health System's pediatric graft survival rate is slightly lower than expected after 1 month but better than expected at 1 year and 3 years after kidney transplant, based on results from SRTR.

UMHS Source: Hospital Organ Transplant Information System.
Comparison Group Source: Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR).

Patient Survival Rates After Transplant
Higher Value = Better Performance

Details

Why is This Measure Important?

Patient survival is a measure of the success of the kidney transplant. This measure represents the percentage of pediatric patients who survived 1 month, 1 year and 3 years after kidney transplant. The actual patient survival rates for the University of Michigan Health System are compared to the expected rates for our institution calculated by the U.S. Scientific Registry for Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Although the SRTR expected rates are adjusted to account for the severity of illness of our transplant population, the adjustment is not perfect. In this graph, a percentage that is higher than the SRTR expected rate means better performance.

How is UMHS Performing?

The University of Michigan Health System's pediatric patient survival rate is better than expected after 1 month, 1year and 3 years after kidney transplant, based on results from SRTR.

UMHS Source: Hospital Organ Transplant Information System.
Comparison Group Source: Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR).