Congenital Heart Center

As an international referral center for children with complex heart disease, the University of Michigan Congenital Heart Center at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital is one of the largest and most highly-rated congenital heart programs in the United States.

From diagnosis and medical management of common cardiac disorders to application of the most complex and innovative therapies available, our specialists are committed to providing the most advanced, evidence-based care for infants, children and adolescents with all forms of congenital and acquired heart disease, as well as for adults with congenital heart disease.

Procedure volume is the number of times a procedure was performed in a year. This measure is often used to assess experience and expertise of both the surgeon and the team caring for the patient. Studies have linked higher volumes with more successful outcomes for some types of procedures. The following graph shows the total number of pediatric and congenital heart operations performed each year. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons classifies programs performing more than 250 operations per year as high volume centers.

Total Cardiac Surgery Volumes

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Why is This Measure Important?

The graph shows the total number of pediatric and congenital heart operations performed each year. Volume is important, as many studies have linked higher volumes with better outcomes following congenital heart surgery.

How is C.S. Mott Children's Hospital performing?

Our annual surgical volumes are among the highest in the nation and significantly exceed the 250 cases per year that The Society of Thoracic Surgeons uses to identify high volume hospitals. Our volume makes us one of the most experienced programs worldwide.

UMHS Source: Registry data from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database
Benchmark: Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database

In this section, we report outcomes following congenital heart surgery compared to available national benchmarks from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). There are a variety of different heart defects and types of congenital heart operations. Comparing outcomes for each type of operation can be difficult because hospitals typically perform a relatively small number of each type of operation. For this reason, it is recommended that operations be grouped based on the "STAT" system (Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery Risk Stratification System). In this system, operations are grouped by complexity ranging from Category 1 (least complex) to Category 5 (most complex).

Common operations within each STAT category:

STAT Category 1: Atrial septal defect repair, ventricular septal defect repair, coarctation repair, subaortic stenosis resection, pulmonary valve replacement, conduit replacement

STAT Category 2: Tetralogy of Fallot repair, Fontan operation, Ross operation

STAT Category 3: Hemifontan operation, arterial switch operation, complete atrioventricular septal defect repair

STAT Category 4: Aortic arch repair, arterial switch operation with ventricular septal defect closure, heart transplant, aorto-pulmonary shunt, total anomalous pulmonary venous return repair, truncus arteriousus repair

STAT Category 5: Norwood (stage I) operation, hybrid stage 1 operation, double switch operation, truncus arteriosus with interrupted aortic arch repair


30 Day Mortality

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Why is This Measure Important?

30 day mortality rates compared to national data from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database are displayed in the graph. This measure is important because it indicates the success of the operation. In this graph, a percentage that is lower is better.

How is C.S. Mott Children's Hospital performing?

Studies have shown that for lower complexity operations (STAT Categories 1-3), most hospitals perform similarly. As seen in the graph, our outcomes compare favorably with national STS benchmarks for these operations. For higher complexity operations (STAT Categories 4 and 5), studies have shown that there is a considerable difference in outcomes between hospitals. For these operations, our mortality rates are lower (better) than the national average.

Benchmark: Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database

Post-operative Length of Stay

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Why is This Measure Important?

Post-operative length of hospital stay compared to national data from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Congenital Heart Surgery Database is displayed in the graph. This measure is important because it indicates how quickly patients recover after surgery. Patients who experience complications generally stay in the hospital longer. Studies have also suggested that longer hospital lengths of stay may be associated with worse outcomes over the long-term, particularly for neurologic function and development. In this graph, a shorter (lower) length of stay is better.

How is C.S. Mott Children's Hospital performing?

Our length of stay is shorter (better) than the national average across all STAT categories.

Benchmark: Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database

Society of Thoracic Surgeons Rating

stars

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Why is This Measure Important?

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons gives an overall rating to congenital heart surgery programs based on their 30 day mortality rates using a star system. This measure is important because it reflects the overall success of the program across all operations.
In this graph, more stars = better rating.
One star = overall mortality rate above (worse than) national average
Two star = overall mortality rate comparable to national average
Three star = overall mortality rate below (better than) national average

How is C.S. Mott Children's Hospital performing?

Our program has received the highest (best) star rating. This rating was received by only 6 programs in the country.

Benchmark: Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database