Blood Disorders (Hematology)

The Adult Hematology Clinic at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center is comprised of faculty from the Division of Hematology/Oncology – the largest subspecialty unit within the Department of Internal Medicine. We care for patients with benign and malignant disorders of the blood and lymphatic organs. Our multidisciplinary team of experts is on the leading edge of research and is committed to providing patients with the very best care and treatment.

Blood disorders and oncology fall under the same category because some of these blood disorders are pre-malignant in nature. In fact, some blood disorders, though not cancerous, can be treated with chemotherapy drugs.

We care for the full spectrum of blood disorders, including:

  • Anemia
  • Bone marrow failure
  • Enzyme deficiencies
  • Hemophilia and Coagulation Disorders (problems with excessive bleeding or clotting)
  • Iron metabolism disorders
  • Myeloid disorders (white blood cells disorder)
  • Thrombosis (including deep vein)
  • Von Willebrand's disease (bleeding disorder)

U-M Blood Disorder Clinics

We have dedicated coagulation, hemophilia and thrombosis clinics, a Blood and Marrow Transplantation program, plus multiple experts in myeloproliferative disorders. We also offer enzyme therapies (an alternate form of cancer treatment), and phase 1 therapies for some blood disorders.

Our diagnostic services include cutting-edge evaluation based upon the expert interpretation of radiographic (X-ray ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET and other nuclear scans) plus laboratory studies.

Therapeutic services include single-agent and multi-agent chemotherapy, "high dose" chemotherapy for bone marrow transplantation, immunotherapy (helps your body's own defenses fight the disease), blood transfusion, management of cancer and chemotherapy-related symptoms, and genetic counseling about cancer risk and chemoprevention.