Cetyl Myristoleate

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Cetyl Myristoleate

Uses

Cetyl myristoleate (CMO) is the common name for cis-9-cetyl myristoleate. CMO was discovered in 1972 by Harry W. Diehl, Ph.D., a researcher at the National Institutes of Health. At the time, Dr. Diehl was responsible for testing anti-inflammatory drugs on lab animals. In order for him to test the drugs, he first had to artificially induce arthritis in the animals by injecting a heat-killed bacterium called Freund’s adjuvant. Dr. Diehl discovered that Swiss albino mice did not get arthritis after injection of Freund’s adjuvant. Eventually, he was able to determine that cetyl myristoleate was the factor present naturally in mice that was responsible for this protection. When CMO was injected into various strains of rats, it offered the same protection against arthritis.1

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3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
Osteoarthritis
540 mg per day by mouth for 30 days
Cetyl myristoleate appears to be effective as a joint “lubricant” and anti-inflammatory agent.

Cetyl myristoleate (CMO) has been proposed to act as a joint “lubricant” and anti-inflammatory agent. In a double-blind trial, people with various types of arthritis who had failed to respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) received CMO (540 mg per day orally for 30 days), while others received a placebo.2 These people also applied CMO or placebo topically, according to their perceived need. A statistically significant 63.5% of those using CMO improved, compared with only 14.5% of those using placebo.

2 Stars
Rheumatoid Arthritis
540 mg daily for 30 days
Cetyl myristoleate may help relieve rheumatoid arthritis symptoms by acting as a joint “lubricant” and anti-inflammatory agent.

Cetyl myristoleate (CMO) has been proposed to act as a joint “lubricant” and anti-inflammatory agent. In a double-blind trial, people with various types of arthritis that had failed to respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs received either CMO (540 mg per day orally for 30 days) or a placebo.3 These people also applied CMO or placebo topically, according to their perceived need. Sixty-four percent of those receiving CMO improved, compared with 14% of those receiving placebo. More research is needed to determine whether CMO has a legitimate place in the treatment options offered RA patients.

How It Works

How to Use It

Generally, CMO is taken in the amount of 400 to 500 mg daily for 30 days.

Where to Find It

Cetyl myristoleate is found in certain animals, including cows, whales, beavers, and mice. As a nutritional supplement it is found in a highly purified, refined form in capsules and tablets. CMO is also available in creams and lotions for topical application.

Possible Deficiencies

As CMO is not an essential nutrient, no deficiency state exists.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Diehl HW, May EL. Cetyl myristoleate isolated from Swiss albino mice: an apparent protective agent against adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Pharm Sci 1994;83:296-9.

2. Siemandi H. The effect of cis-9-cetyl myristoleate (CMO) and adjunctive therapy on arthritis and auto-immune disease: a randomized trial. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients 1997;Aug/Sept:58-63.

3. Siemandi H. The effect of cis-9-cetyl myristoleate (CMO) and adjunctive therapy on arthritis and auto-immune disease: a randomized trial. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients 1997;Aug/Sept:58-63.

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