Potassium Chloride

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Topic Contents

Potassium Chloride

Drug Information

Potassium chloride is a prescription drug used to replace potassium in people with low blood levels of potassium, to prevent potassium depletion in specific diseases or resulting from specific drug therapies, and to help lower mild high blood pressure in some people. Potassium chloride is also available without prescription in some supplements and in salt substitutes found in grocery stores. While potassium depletion is a health risk, high levels of potassium are also associated with health risks. Potassium-containing drugs should be used only under medical supervision. The potassium found in fruit is both safe and healthful for most people, except those taking potassium-sparing diuretic drugs and individuals with kidney failure.

Common brand names:

K-Lyte, Klorvess, K-Dur 10, K-Tab, Klor-Con

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • none

Explanation Required 

  • Salt Substitutes

    Salt substitutes (No Salt®, Salt Substitute®, Lite Salt®, and others) contain potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride. They are used by people on sodium-restricted diets. When used in moderation, they are a more healthful choice for many people compared with using regular table salt. However, people taking potassium chloride drug products should consult with their prescribing doctor before using salt substitutes1 or even eating large amounts of high-potassium foods (primarily fruit).

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

References

1. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15-6c.

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