Potassium Chloride

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Potassium Chloride

Interaction

Potassium Chloride

Potassium chloride is a prescription drug used to replace potassium in people with low blood levels of potassium, to prevent potassium depletion in specific diseases or resulting from specific drug therapies, and to help lower mild high blood pressure in some people. Potassium chloride is also available without prescription in some supplements and in salt substitutes found in grocery stores. While potassium depletion is a health risk, high levels of potassium are also associated with health risks. Potassium-containing drugs should be used only under medical supervision. The potassium found in fruit is both safe and healthful for most people, except those taking potassium-sparing diuretic drugs and individuals with kidney failure.

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Depletion or interference—This medication may deplete these substances from the body or interfere with how they work; extra intake may help replenish them.

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dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Side effect reduction and/or prevention—These substances may help reduce the likelihood and/or severity of a potential side effect caused by the medication.

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dnicon_Beneficial May Be Beneficial: Supportive interaction—These substances may help this medication work better.

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dnicon_Avoid Avoid: Reduces drug effectiveness—When taking this medication, avoid these substances as they may decrease the medication's absorption and/or activity in the body.

none

dnicon_Avoid Avoid: Adverse interaction—When taking this medication, avoid these substances, as the combination may cause undesirable or dangerous interactions.

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dnicon_Check Check: Explanation needed—When taking this medication, read the article details and discuss them with your doctor or pharmacist before taking these substances.

Salt Substitutes


An asterisk (*) next to an item in the summary indicates that the interaction is supported only by weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Interactions Details

Interactions with Vitamins

Salt substitutes

Salt substitutes (No Salt®, Salt Substitute®, Lite Salt®, and others) contain potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride. They are used by people on sodium-restricted diets. When used in moderation, they are a more healthful choice for many people compared with using regular table salt. However, people taking potassium chloride drug products should consult with their prescribing doctor before using salt substitutes1 or even eating large amounts of high-potassium foods (primarily fruit).

Interactions with Herbs

Digitalis (Digitalis lanata, Digitalis purpurea)

Digitalis refers to a family of plants commonly called foxglove that contain digitalis glycosides, chemicals with actions and toxicities similar to the prescription drug digoxin. Low serum potassium increases the risk of digitalis toxicity.2 People using digitalis-containing products should have their potassium status monitored by the healthcare professional overseeing the digitalis therapy.

Interactions with Foods & Other Compounds

Food

Potassium chloride drugs should be taken after meals to avoid stomach upset.3 Potassium-containing salt substitutes, however, are meant to be taken with food. Tablets should be swallowed whole and chewing or crushing should be avoided.4 Liquid, powder, and effervescent potassium chloride products may be dissolved in a glass of cold water or juice to mask the unpleasant flavor.5

Brands

Common brand names:

K-Lyte, Klorvess, K-Dur 10, K-Tab, Klor-Con

References

1. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15–6c.

2. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15–6c.

3. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15–6c.

4. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15–6c.

5. Threlkeld DS, ed. Nutritional Products, Minerals and Electrolytes, Oral, Potassium Replacement Products. In Facts and Comparisons Drug Information. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, Jul 1992, 15–6c.

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